904-438-8109 info@rethreaded.com

Educational Art Legacy Project

Foreword by First Lady Molly Curry

As the mother of two young women, I believe that empowering women and girls to achieve their full potential is a universal responsibility of us all. While we have made good progress in advancing resources to lift women up and out of the terrible cycle of human trafficking, sadly more and more women still need our help to avoid being trafficked and to realize their full potential.

I am so proud to have worked with Rethreaded survivors on this special project to portray their journey of healing as they rebuild their lives. This educational art installation will serve as a gateway to reigniting hope for survivors and a resource to the community on how to help. The educational art will become a destination for Jacksonville, allowing for all who enter the Rethreaded Delores Barr Weaver Campus of Hope to become an advocate for ending human trafficking.

Government and nonprofits can’t end this alone. It will take all of us – all sectors – committed and working together to ensure the safety of survivors. I challenge every business in Jacksonville to take the pledge to train 100% of their employees on how to spot and report suspected human trafficking safely and effectively. I am proud to announce that the City of Jacksonville, JAX Chamber, and Visit Jacksonville have already committed to this challenge. Join the fight and let’s stand together to end human trafficking in our city, state, and country. Click here to learn more and to register your business.

About Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is a crime that occurs in every city in every state, and it is a pervasive issue that affects individuals of all backgrounds and demographics. U.S. law defines human trafficking as the use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel a person into commercial sex acts or labor or services against his or her will. Causing someone under the age of 18 to engage in a commercial sex act, regardless of using force, fraud, or coercion is human trafficking under U.S. law.

According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, Florida ranks third in the United States for reported human trafficking cases, and Jacksonville ranks 42 out of the top 100 most populous U.S. cities based on cases created by the hotline as of a report published in 2017.

Increased community education about how to identify human trafficking along with increased awareness of resources and services for those affected by criminal exploitation can help restore freedom and dignity to survivors as well as decrease the number of future victims.

Effectively combating human trafficking requires commitment by all and collaboration between federal, state, and local governments, the private sector, philanthropy, and nonprofit partners.

Myths about human trafficking

DB+
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Myth 1: Human trafficking doesn’t happen in my city

100% of Rethreaded’s women were trafficked in Northeast Florida and Jacksonville. Survivors can be recruited and trafficked in their own hometowns, even their own homes. Human trafficking has been reported in all 50 states. (Polaris Project)
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Myth 2: Human trafficking involves being kidnapped

Only 5% of trafficking cases in the United States are abductions. The other 95% are traffickers exploiting a person’s vulnerabilities in their current environment. Common vulnerabilities include drug addiction, homelessness, need to belong. (Polaris Project)
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Myth 3: Traffickers don’t know their victims

Contrary to popular belief, most traffickers do not pick people off of the street to target, rather they target people close to them. 42% of victims were brought into trafficking by a family member and 39% were recruited by an intimate partner. (Polaris Project)
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Myth 4: Leaving trafficking is the hardest part

While it can be extremely hard to escape, one of the hardest parts is rebuilding a life afterwards. One large barrier is steady employment. In fact, without a stable job, 80% of women who have been trafficked will likely be trafficked again.

Signs of Someone Who is Experiencing Human Trafficking

  • Owe money to an employer or recruiter or are not being paid what they were promised or are owed.
  • Are living and working in isolated conditions, largely cut off from interaction with others or support systems.
  • Appear to be monitored by another person when talking or interacting with others.
  • Physical abuse such as burn marks, bruises, or cuts.
  • Visit the Polaris Project or the Human Trafficking Hotline to learn more about recognizing the signs.

 

About the Project

The First Lady Molly Curry Educational Art Legacy Project is a community education program that features a survivor-inspired mosaic and mural art installation located at Rethreaded’s Delores Barr Weaver Campus of Hope. The art will provide inspiration and hope for the current and future survivors of human trafficking as well as educate the community on prevention and intervention strategies.

The project goal is to raise awareness of the impact of human trafficking, educate citizens on the availability of resources and trauma-informed care, and to provide survivors with an art display that will serve as a symbol of hope and resiliency that fosters healing.

About the Art

Inspiration Art

Through the exploration of creating healing art, Rethreaded survivors participated in an art visioning session guided by mosaic artist Kate Rouh and muralist Nico. During this session, the survivors shared their stories and created art that represented what their journey to renew hope, reignite dreams, and release potential looked like for them. The completed art installation reflects back to the survivors their artistic interpretation of their journey of healing though reflective mirror, painted imagery, and colorful tile pieces including upcycled items personally selected by the survivors.

Scroll through this section to hear from the survivors and advocates who inspired this art.
Stephanie, Survivor

Stephanie, Survivor

“I am one who enjoys a good hike up a snowy mountainside, a long day laying on a sandy beach in the Florida sunshine, or a rainy day on the couch with a good movie. These are all things I didn’t know that I enjoyed while I was in the life of trafficking. I have been broken and rebuilt over the years. Some parts of my healing have been lonely and dark, while others are full of community and light. All of the hard nights and bright days have led me here. Discovering yourself and your passion is not easy, my healing work has been hard and messy. When I think about where I was in 2016 and look at where I am now, I wouldn’t trade the hard nights for anything. I want to live my life to the fullest. I want to advocate for those who don’t know they enjoy a good hike up a snowy mountainside, a long day laying on a sandy beach in the Florida sunshine, or a rainy day on the couch with a good movie.”

Kris, Survivor

Kris, Survivor

“I am one who creates a culture of kindness and prefers to believe the best in others. I am a survivor of childhood abuse, drug addiction, complex trauma, human trafficking, and feelings of worthlessness. But now I am not only surviving, I am thriving. I have gone from a shadow of a person to a woman of substance. Through hard work in therapy and the culture of Rethreaded, I was reminded of my value and my worth. I grew up thinking that God was disappointed in me, but I now know that my God loves me and is always on my side. Working at Rethreaded has completely reignited my desire to create. I get to take material that would otherwise end up in a landfill and turn it into amazing products. Along with sewing, I have learned so many new leather working techniques. Although the journey hasn’t been easy, I am a better me now and am improving each day.”

Shirley, Survivor

Shirley, Survivor

“My recovery journey began in 2014 and today I am one who loves life. I remember the darkness and pain but today I know the Light. I love to see that light come on in others and watch them grow into who they are supposed to be. As a survivor, my journey to healing has taken me on paths I never could have imagined, especially since I have been here at Rethreaded. I have gained confidence in myself. I am at a place in my healing where I can help others heal. I have discovered my love of travel and have been as far away as Alaska and have many more trips planned. Today I get to be a worker, friend, sister, mother and most of all Granny! I am becoming who I was created to be. I believe ‘Together We Can’ do anything. It takes community, love, and compassion to help others along this journey. God is good because I know that, without a doubt, He saved my life. As a survivor I want other women to know that you can always change the path you are on. It’s never too late and you are never too old to learn to live.”

Kristin Keen, Rethreaded Founder & President

Kristin Keen, Rethreaded Founder & President

“I am one that loves sunrise swims in the oceans, seeing the underdog win, visiting beautiful places, and I am deeply passionate about seeing people given a chance to be who they were created to be. As an advocate my journey of renewing hope has been a mixture of dark and light times. I have learned that healing means you are able to hold the hard things as well as all the beautiful things in our lives. As I have healed, I have been able to create more space in my life to hold Joy, Peace, compassion and create space for others to heal as well. It has been the honor of my life to walk alongside women who have experienced human trafficking as they fight through the hard things, heal, and then pave a way for the women coming behind her. The women of Rethreaded are proof to me that the impossible is possible. Through community and hard work, there is nothing that we can’t accomplish. I am eternally grateful to bear witness to the healing power of community every day.

First Lady Molly Curry, Survivor Advocate

First Lady Molly Curry, Survivor Advocate

“I am always inspired by sunsets. They symbolize peace, harmony, and the promise of renewal. When the sun fades below the horizon, it represents the completion of a journey. As a long-time champion of Rethreaded, I am so proud of the vision and mission of the Rethreaded and its advocates. I selected human trafficking and Rethreaded as the focus of my legacy project because I care DEEPLY about finding a solution to this problem. We all need to come together as a community to be part of the solution. Through this education art initiative, visitors will be able to personally connect to the woman whose stories of survival have been shared so they too can become advocates for ending human trafficking. Survivors have done the work to end their trauma, we need to do our part to ensure their success.”

About the art

Inspiration Art

Through the exploration of creating healing art, Rethreaded survivors participated in an art visioning session guided by mosaic artist Kate Rouh and muralist Nico. During this session, the survivors shared their stories and created art that represented what their journey to renew hope, reignite dreams, and release potential looked like for them. The completed art installation reflects back to the survivors their artistic interpretation of their journey of healing though reflective mirror, painted imagery, and colorful tile pieces including upcycled items personally selected by the survivors.

Stephanie, Survivor

Kris, Survivor

Shirley, Survivor

Kristin Keen, Rethreaded Founder & President

First Lady Molly Curry, Survivor Advocate

Scroll through this section to hear from the survivors and advocates who inspired this art.

Stephanie, Survivor

“I am one who enjoys a good hike up a snowy mountainside, a long day laying on a sandy beach in the Florida sunshine, or a rainy day on the couch with a good movie. These are all things I didn’t know that I enjoyed while I was in the life of trafficking. I have been broken and rebuilt over the years. Some parts of my healing have been lonely and dark, while others are full of community and light. All of the hard nights and bright days have led me here. Discovering yourself and your passion is not easy, my healing work has been hard and messy. When I think about where I was in 2016 and look at where I am now, I wouldn’t trade the hard nights for anything. I want to live my life to the fullest. I want to advocate for those who don’t know they enjoy a good hike up a snowy mountainside, a long day laying on a sandy beach in the Florida sunshine, or a rainy day on the couch with a good movie.”

Kris, Survivor

“I am one who creates a culture of kindness and prefers to believe the best in others. I am a survivor of childhood abuse, drug addiction, complex trauma, human trafficking, and feelings of worthlessness. But now I am not only surviving, I am thriving. I have gone from a shadow of a person to a woman of substance. Through hard work in therapy and the culture of Rethreaded, I was reminded of my value and my worth. I grew up thinking that God was disappointed in me, but I now know that my God loves me and is always on my side. Working at Rethreaded has completely reignited my desire to create. I get to take material that would otherwise end up in a landfill and turn it into amazing products. Along with sewing, I have learned so many new leather working techniques. Although the journey hasn’t been easy, I am a better me now and am improving each day.”

Shirley, Survivor

“My recovery journey began in 2014 and today I am one who loves life. I remember the darkness and pain but today I know the Light. I love to see that light come on in others and watch them grow into who they are supposed to be. As a survivor, my journey to healing has taken me on paths I never could have imagined, especially since I have been here at Rethreaded. I have gained confidence in myself. I am at a place in my healing where I can help others heal. I have discovered my love of travel and have been as far away as Alaska and have many more trips planned. Today I get to be a worker, friend, sister, mother and most of all Granny! I am becoming who I was created to be. I believe ‘Together We Can’ do anything. It takes community, love, and compassion to help others along this journey. God is good because I know that, without a doubt, He saved my life. As a survivor I want other women to know that you can always change the path you are on. It’s never too late and you are never too old to learn to live.”

Kristin Keen, Rethreaded Founder & President

“I am one that loves sunrise swims in the oceans, seeing the underdog win, visiting beautiful places, and I am deeply passionate about seeing people given a chance to be who they were created to be. As an advocate my journey of renewing hope has been a mixture of dark and light times. I have learned that healing means you are able to hold the hard things as well as all the beautiful things in our lives. As I have healed, I have been able to create more space in my life to hold Joy, Peace, compassion and create space for others to heal as well. It has been the honor of my life to walk alongside women who have experienced human trafficking as they fight through the hard things, heal, and then pave a way for the women coming behind her. The women of Rethreaded are proof to me that the impossible is possible. Through community and hard work, there is nothing that we can’t accomplish. I am eternally grateful to bear witness to the healing power of community every day.

First Lady Molly Curry, Survivor Advocate

“I am always inspired by sunsets. They symbolize peace, harmony, and the promise of renewal. When the sun fades below the horizon, it represents the completion of a journey. As a long-time champion of Rethreaded, I am so proud of the vision and mission of the Rethreaded and its advocates. I selected human trafficking and Rethreaded as the focus of my legacy project because I care DEEPLY about finding a solution to this problem. We all need to come together as a community to be part of the solution. Through this education art initiative, visitors will be able to personally connect to the woman whose stories of survival have been shared so they too can become advocates for ending human trafficking. Survivors have done the work to end their trauma, we need to do our part to ensure their success.”

Artist Walk-Through

The Art

Reclaiming the Light: A Survivor’s Journey, co-created by mosaic art team RouxArt and muralist Nico, shares the story of a survivor’s path to healing from human trafficking and honors the women who found the strength and courage to rebuild their lives. This art serves as a beacon of hope for future survivors and connects visitors to education materials so they can become advocates for ending human trafficking. Imagery representing the survivor’s personal journey of healing shared during the art visioning session can be found throughout the art installation.

 

The art journey begins as the bird is breaking free from the mirrored cage among the swirls of chaos. The stars guide its way by providing a glimmer of light and hope in the darkness of night. With the dawn of a new day, the swirls of the night begin to untangle into waves of Grace Scarf threads. With the strength of a supportive community, hope is reignited and takes flight toward the light. Colors transition from deep, heavier colors into bright, vibrant hues to reflect the transition from night into day. Under the risen sun, the wavy threads bundle and tie together to form a beautiful, infinity scarf. Wearing the trademark teal Rethreaded Grace Scarf, the glowing and radiant abstract woman embodies renewal and realized potential. These themes of beauty, joy and celebration continue into the serenity garden and ends in the backyard with an interactive piece of art. 

Self-Guided Art Tour

The self-guided tour begins at the entrance of the Rethreaded’s Delores Barr Weaver Campus of Hope and then wraps around the tower onto the back. The serenity garden is a private section of the art for survivors and is closed to the public. To view the Floral Bouquet, please email info@rethreaded.com or call 904-438-8109 for public tour dates. Scroll through the art sections below to tour the art. Click here to download the Self-Guided Art Tour Brochure. 

Birds Released from Cage:

The released bird flying away from the open mirrored cage represents freedom and signifies the beginning of a survivor’s journey. The birds’ colors transform as they fly away from the cage and towards the risen sun.

Swirls and Stars:

The swirls represent the fearful uncertainty and chaos the survivors experience throughout their
journey of healing. The stars reflect the light and hope amidst the darkness of night.

The Dawn:

The sunrise represents the beginning of a new day and the start of a journey. The sun peeking above the horizon represents the light which shines through when trauma begins to heal.

Community of Women:

Survivors heal through and with a supportive and genuine community. Visitors can better understand the personal journey of healing as they see themselves reflected in the mosaic and read the personal words survivors used to describe their journey.

Igniting Hope:

The bird represents hope and the heart it carries embodies the authentic self-love survivors learn to develop and embrace through their journey. As Emily Dickinson portrays in her poem “Hope is the thing with feathers,” hope is a miraculous and powerful force that is impossible to defeat.

Flowers:

The flowers throughout the art portrays the blossoming of one’s authentic self. Just as a seed needs meticulous care to fully bloom, healing is a process that takes time, patience, self-love, and grace for oneself to be transformed.

Grace Scarf:

The Rethreaded Grace Scarf is a symbol of hope, community, and second chances. When a survivor employee begins work at Rethreaded, the Grace Scarf is the first item she learns to make as she begins to rebuild her life. The swirls at the beginning of the art create the threads of the woman’s teal Grace Scarf seen wrapped around the woman in full bloom.

Woman in Full Bloom:

Warmed by the sun and surrounded by blossoming flowers, this woman represents acceptance and self-realization of one’s full potential. Beaming and full of joy, the woman embodies renewal and hope. Through the abstract style of her portrait, she represents all women and allows the viewer to see themselves reflected. Human trafficking can impact any person and healing can be accomplished by all—for this purpose the woman was created to be a universal portrait of a survivor.

Rays from the Risen Sun:

A risen sun is a symbol of rebirth and signifies a new chapter. The rays from the sun that are seen brightening the woman’s face signifies peace, energy, joy, and celebration.

Serenity Garden:

This special section of the art is for survivors and is closed to the public. This private reflective space allows for the meditative healing necessary to continue the journey forward. A universal symbol for change and transformation, vibrant butterflies flutter joyfully and gracefully through the garden among the flowers in full bloom.

Floral Bouquet:

Connected by the strings of the teal Grace Scarf, the mirrored floral bouquet is a self-reflective piece of art that allows advocates to affirm their commitment to ending human trafficking.

About the Artists

Kate Garcia Rouh & Kenny Rouh are RouxArt and together they make transformational mosaic art. Kate is a lifelong artist and previous art teacher for more than 20 years, and Kenny is retired from Crowley Maritime. RouxArt has over a 12 year history of creating mosaic art in Jacksonville and has completed numerous works of public art to visually inspire Jacksonville, including the “Mirrored River: Where Do You See Yourself” under the Main Street Bridge and the “Sugar Hill Mosaic” in partnership with Groundwork Jacksonville.

 

“We were drawn to this project by the inspirational mission of Rethreaded as it aligns well with our work. Mosaic art takes broken pieces to form beauty. Rethreaded takes broken lives and fills them with hope for a brighter future.”

RouxArt, Kate and Kenny Rouh

Nicole Holderbaum aka “Nico” is a Florida-based visual artist and community organizer. Nico trained in art schools and programs growing up, eventually leaving home to further develop her career in Jacksonville as a street artist. Nico has painted murals around the world and has been commissioned by & collaborated with globally-recognized brands and businesses. She has established a track record as a community leader and youth empowerment enthusiast and has been recognized in Jacksonville as a “Community Champion” and “Art Innovator’.

“I have admired and respected the Rethreaded organization since the beginning of my career, it is a dream come true to finally have the honor of collaborating and contributing something to their movement.”

Nicole "Nico" Holderbaum

How to Help

It will take everyone in our community committed and working together to be part of the solution in ending human trafficking and restoring freedom to survivors. Survivors have done the work to end their trauma, we need to do our part to ensure their success. We challenge every person and business in Jacksonville to take the pledge to become trained on how to spot and report suspected human trafficking safely and effectively. The resources and information in this section will help you achieve this goal. If you have any questions or need any assistance, please contact info@rethreaded.com.

     

    Take the 100% Club Training and Become a Certified Advocate:

    The 100% Club is a video training initiative started by Attorney General Ashley Moody with a goal of educating the public on how to safely spot and report human trafficking. This training consists of one video and takes about an hour to complete. After completion you will receive a certificate to recognize your advocacy.

    Fill out the form below to receive the training materials and join the 100% Club. By submitting the form, you will be registered to receive community education resources and updates.

     

       

      “Each of us can do something that nobody else can do. I think that it’s a gift. It’s a gift you’ve received. So, how much can you give back?”
      -Dr. Frances Bartlett Kinne

      Report Human Trafficking

      If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call 911. If you believe you may have information about a trafficking situation, contact the following:

        • Human Trafficking Hotline – Anti-Trafficking Hotline Advocates are available 24/7 to take reports of potential human trafficking. All communication with the hotline is strictly confidential (Confidentiality Policy). See below for ways to contact the hotline:
          1. Call the National Human Trafficking Hotline toll-free hotline at 1-888-373-7888. Callers can dial 711 to access the Hotline using TTY.
          2. Text the National Human Trafficking Hotline at “BeFree” (233733). Message and data rates may apply.
          3. Chat the National Human Trafficking Hotline via humantraffickinghotline.org/chat
          4. Submit a tip online to the Human Trafficking Hotline through the anonymous online reporting form.

       

      Training

      Florida Alliance to End Human Trafficking – In collaboration with the Florida Forensic Institute for Research, Security, and Tactics, the Florida Alliance to End Human Trafficking developed a one-hour training course that focuses on detecting human trafficking, best practices for reporting human trafficking, and the interventions and treatment for survivors of human trafficking. Click here to learn more. 

      Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation (DBPR)Click here for a list of Human Trafficking Awareness approved curriculums.

      Free Human Trafficking Training Links:

      Resources

      National

      • National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) – is a national anti-trafficking hotline and resource center serving victims and survivors of human trafficking and the anti-trafficking community in the United States. For the latest available stats and figures, click here to visit the National Human Trafficking Hotline’s website to view data about Florida.
      • Polaris Project  is a nonprofit that was founded to create long-term solutions that address the underlying systems which allow human trafficking to occur. They operate the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline, conduct trainings, provide services to trafficking victims, and more.
      • Blue Campaign – is a national public awareness campaign within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) designed to educate the public, law enforcement and other industry partners to recognize the indicators of human trafficking, and how to appropriately respond to possible cases. Blue Campaign works closely with DHS Components to develop general awareness trainings, as well as specific educational resources to help reduce victimization within vulnerable populations.
      • Blue Campaign Toolkits:

        *Click here to view more toolkits.

      State

       

      Local

      In Memory of Dr. Frances Bartlett Kinne

      The First Lady Molly Curry Educational Art Legacy Project is made possible by a generous donation from the Dr. Frances Bartlett Kinne Estate to the City of Jacksonville. Dr. Frances Bartlett Kinne dedicated over 60 years of service to Jacksonville University (JU) and the greater Jacksonville community. Serving as Florida’s first female university president, Kinne served as Jacksonville University’s president for 10 years, followed by her time as Chancellor and Chancellor Emerita. She began her career at Jacksonville University in 1958 as a humanities professor, became founding dean of JU’s College of Fine Arts in 1961, and served in that capacity until being named president in 1979.

       

      Known for her joy for life, trademark brightly colored clothes and her selfless service to others, Dr. Kinne was a remarkable educator and administrator as well as an accomplished musician and author who leaves behind an incredible legacy. She paved an important path for women and serves as inspiration for people across the globe. To learn more about Dr. Kinne and her Legacy, click here to visit the Jacksonville University’s website.

      Due to the recent storm Ian, the Rethreaded store will be closed Thursday and Friday for the safety of our staff and customers. We will reopen Monday.